Get Great Results From Employees: SAFE uses the Law of Attraction to Achieve Dramatic Performance

great results from employeeAs a manager you probably use a process for goal setting and tracking that is based on the acronym SMART. SMART provides you with the ability to track your subordinates’ progress and gives you opportunities for coaching and performance improvement.

SMART is a linear, logical process that fits nicely with traditional management styles. But it may not be the best tool for supporting great breakthroughs and getting dramatic performance improvements. In this, as well as employee development, a new goal setting process, SAFE, may offer superior results.

SAFE is non-linear and a bit illogical, in that faith plays a big part in SAFE’s process.

SAFE combines the best aspects of SMART with the power of the Law of Attraction. SAFE stands for

  • See your goal,
  • Accept it,
  • Feel it with emotion, and
  • Express it.

You may be initially reluctant to acknowledge, let alone utilize, the power of the spiritual world. Traditionally, business has relegated spirituality to something employees do on Sunday. But that is changing. The science of quantum physics is beginning to confirm much of traditional spiritual wisdom, including the Law of Attraction. Businesses that thrive in the future will take advantage of Universal wisdom and learn to access the full power of attraction and creativity.

The SAFE Method of Goal Setting

Pick a business goal for your group that involves the entire group. Perhaps there’s a quality or customer service target that would set your group apart from the average group others doing similar work. Let’s use a customer service goal as an example.

See the Vision

Begin by imagining the customer service goal that would set a new standard for your business or industry. Do you feel excited? Good, now ignore the next thoughts of how in the world you’ll accomplish this new standard. That will come later. For now, it’s important to See the goal achieved and to Accept that the ways to get there will come.

Accept, Feel, and Express

Spend some time visualizing your world after the goal is achieved. See, with rich emotion, the recognition you and your group receive from your company, from customers, and from business analysts. In your mind, read the articles about your group’s accomplishments. Feel the pride that comes with a team of people making a great accomplishment.

Replay (Express) this vision several times over a few days, each time enriching it with emotion and detail.

Share Your Vision

Now it’s time to enroll your employees. Gather them together and share your vision for the future. Ask them to withhold questions about how to achieve the vision. Share your vision in great detail, painting a rich picture that includes customer’s positive reactions and stunning recognition for each employee.

Seek to enroll everyone in the vision as something worthwhile and exciting. Ask them to think about the vision over the next few days without trying to figure out how to accomplish it.

Each day, send out an email or a voice message reinforcing some aspect of the vision. As you discuss business issues make it a point to touch on the vision. Perhaps put together a collage of the vision and post it on a bulletin board.

The How

Refrain from trying to lay out the action steps to reach the goal. Instead, accept the nudges of intuition and inspiration that naturally come as a result of holding the vision strongly in mind.

Soon you’ll find that the appropriate action steps are apparent; they’ve surfaced as inspirations, questions, and suggestions during your many vision meetings. Begin working toward the vision as actionable ideas unfold. Don’t worry about identifying all the action items; they’ll unfold over time. Continue to see the vision clearly and with emotion, trusting the process.

SAFE

Using SAFE, you’ll find your employees engaged, enthused, and motivated. They’re a part of the vision, perhaps each seeing it from a different perspective and with differing motivations. But they will be engaged and committed as long as the vision is held firmly in view as the group’s future.

Creating a Strategic Plan: How to Achieve a Strategic State of Mind

businessplan1Entrepreneurs have it constantly drilled into their heads; you’ve got to have a business plan. You may have written and rewritten your plan so many times you can now do it in your sleep. But when it comes to strategic planning, you have to clear your mind and look at your business from a new perspective.

A business plan usually runs quite a few pages detailing the company’s products or services, market, competition, unique positioning, operating details, staffing, and financial projections. Creating the plan requires mentally rehearsing everything that’s going to happen over the next few years in a reasonable amount of detail.

A strategic plan, on the other hand, is comparatively brief. At most a page or two, it jumps further into the future envisioning how the market, business climate, or technology will have changed in three or four years, and what the company needs to do to continue being successful and competitive in the predicted new environment.

When you’re head-down in the details of keeping the company thriving in the short term, though, it can be difficult to get out of the trenches and climb a nearby hill to get a clearer view of the future.

For most people, getting out of the day-to-day environment is essential to freeing the mind from the daily barrage. Many business leaders find their annual vacations perfect for spending time reflecting on the future of their companies.

Even away from the office, however, it can still be a challenge to stop thinking about that new account, or that critical staff position you have to fill, or those nagging production line problems. To break out of that mindset, you can use a technique called “.”

To understand flashing forward, you have to first flash back. Think back about three or four years and recall how your business was operating then. If the business is not that old, then think about where you were in your own life. Pick out the important things that have changed between then and now.

Remembering those long ago times, could you have foreseen the important things that changed to create the environment you’re in today? What could you have predicted? What do you wish you had predicted? Without knowing what was coming, what could you have done to position yourself better for the present? What did you do that you’re patting yourself on the back for now?

Now flash forward. Picture yourself three or four years in the future looking back on the present. What is it your future self wishes you had foreseen today? What signs did you miss? What little voice in the back of your head did you not listen to?

At this point you can start becoming specific. From your future vantage point, what changed in the market place? What did the competition do that you didn’t? When did you unexpectedly need financing that you weren’t prepared for? What technology advances affected your business the most?

Putting yourself in the future looking back, you’re using a skill you already have – 20-20 hindsight – to help predict the future.

By imagining what’s coming, you can see what’s needed now to prepare. When you put it on paper, it’s your strategic plan.